Category Archives: FEMA

New Release: Multi-Agency Distribution of Emergency Supplies Plan Template

The purpose of the Multi-Agency Distribution of Emergency Supplies Plan Template is to supplement a jurisdiction’s Emergency Operations Plan and/or Mass Care Annex and is intended to provide guidance and suggested procedures for a jurisdiction to consider in the development of a Distribution of Emergency Supplies Plan. This template is based on best practices and concepts and can be used by any jurisdiction. Additionally, the template can serve as an educational tool to assist jurisdictions, NGOs, faith-based organizations, the private sector, and other stakeholders who provide distribution of emergency supplies to understand the complexities of implementing a coordinated and collaborative operation, including but not limited to: protocols, terminology, types of distribution, and the coordination of the various providers. This comprehensive multi-agency document was developed in coordination with State Mass Care Coordinators, the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, Convoy of Hope, Adventist Community Services, Feeding America, FEMA Headquarters and Regional Mass Care staff, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Multi Agency Distribution of Emergency Supplies Plan Template 2015

Multi-Agency Sheltering/Sheltering Support Plan Template (MASPT)

The purpose of the Multi-Agency Sheltering/Sheltering Support Plan Template (MASPT) is to supplement a jurisdiction’s Emergency Operations Plan and/or Mass Care Annex and is intended to provide guidance and suggested procedures for a jurisdiction to consider in the development of a sheltering plan that focuses on their role of managing and/or supporting sheltering activities. Two years in the works, the comprehensive multi-agency sheltering document was developed in coordination with FEMA Headquarters and Regional Mass Care staff, the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, State Mass Care Coordinators, local emergency management, and the FEMA Office of Disability Integration and Coordination.  The template is based on best practices and concepts that have been proven during previous disasters.

Multi-Agency Sheltering/Sheltering Support Plan Template (MASPT)

FEMA Releases Mass Care Resource Typing Definitions

On Monday, June 30 2014, FEMA released five Mass Care resource typing definitions for final publication and distribution. The guidance contained in these definitions provides a standardized set of minimum criteria for use by the whole community when building, sustaining and inventorying resources; and when planning to deliver or delivering core capabilities through a national mutual aid network to achieve the National Preparedness Goal of a secure and resilient nation.

The Mass Care resource typing definitions are:

  • State Mass Care Coordinator
  • Shelter Management Team
  • Shelter Manager
  • Field Kitchen Unit
  • Field Kitchen Manager

 FEMA developed these resource typing definitions in collaboration with emergency management and public safety practitioners. These stakeholders suggested guidance for specific overall functions, components, capabilities, and ordering specifications for these resources.

This guidance addresses standardized criteria for requests that are made under a variety of mutual aid scenarios from automatic aid to mutual aid provided through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) during declared disasters and other levels of mutual aid.

This guidance aligns with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) to provide a common and standard understanding about the tools and resources needed to sustain, build, and deliver the core capabilities necessary to achieve the National Preparedness Goal. For more information on the NIMS and its implementation, visit FEMA NIMS website.

Resource typing definitions and job title/position qualifications can be accessed using the Resource Typing Library Tool (RTLT). The RTLT is an online catalogue of NIMS resource typing definitions and job titles/position qualifications. The RTLT is publically accessible here: https://www.fema.gov/resource-management-mutual-aid.

Questions can be submitted to the National Integration Center through e-mail at: FEMA-NIMS@fema.dhs.gov.

This effort is part of the National Preparedness System and continues the implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS), a process that organizes the tools and resources needed promote unity of effort and achieve the National Preparedness Goal. For more information on national preparedness efforts, visit FEMA National Preparedness website.

FEMA Releases Updated Donated Resources Policy

Submitted by Jono Anzalone

During the disasters, while local and state officials concentrate on emergency protective measures and life safety, they are often challenged with the amount of downed trees and other debris blocking roads and their communities’ paths to recovery. Power may be out and people needing to eat. Hundreds of volunteers from faith-based groups, community organizations and private companies may quickly show up to help. Volunteers play a key role in any disaster.  Without volunteer labor, equipment or material contributions, many communities would have a much harder time responding and recovering from disasters.

Time and time again, Southern Baptist Disaster Recovery Team volunteers fire up their chainsaws to clear debris from roads, school grounds, parks and other areas. Workers from Presbytery, the National Presbytery Disaster Assistance Response Team, Assemblies of God and  members of other faith based organizations jump in to help. The American Red Cross (ARC) turns out with many volunteers working alongside local voluntary organizations, as well as providing shelters and feeding stations. Firefighters cook meals and the University of Extension offers support to the community. Those who cannot provide physical labor give moral support. Neighbors helping neighbors.

The good news is that some of this volunteer labor and other donated resources may be eligible under FEMA’s Public Assistance Program requirements, when a Presidential Declaration is made, and could help local governments and other state agencies keep more money in their budgets to face future emergencies thanks to the FEMA Donated Resources Policy (RP9525.2). Though credit for donated resources is limited to emergency work such as emergency protective measures and debris removal, it is still good news for many local municipalities and agencies. So many volunteers turn out to help, and the time and other resources they donated will help ease the financial burden on many communities.

Examples of donated resources that may be eligible include volunteer labor for debris removal, sandbagging, or search and rescue operations, mass care activites, as well as donated equipment such as chainsaws, or donated materials such as gloves.

When it comes to donated resources, documentation is key! For volunteer work, local public officials must show hours worked, work site and a description of work for each volunteer. FEMA requires the same data for donated equipment and materials.   For more information, check out FEMA’s Donated Resources Page.

The May 2011 Joplin tornado showed the incredible value the FEMA Policy offers communities, best stated by – Leslie Jones, City of Joplin, Finance Director:

“The $17.7 million of donated resources is the largest amount recorded in the history of Missouri and in FEMA Region VII. There were over 102,000 volunteers working over 610,000 hours along with donated goods and services valued at over $8.5 million, and 12,000 hours of donated equipment use. That’s incredible and the City is very thankful for all who have helped Joplin. Not only did the volunteers help clean up Joplin, but they also helped us financially recover a significant amount of expense.”

In addition to the amazing work performed by voluntary agencies, this force multiplier can save communities valuable tax base in order to kick-start their recovery.

Donated Resources Policy RP9525.2 : Policy | Memo

NEW RELEASE: Post-Disaster Reunification of Children: A Nationwide Approach

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and American Red Cross (ARC) recently released the Post Disaster Reunification of Children:  A Nationwide Approach.  This document reflects our Nation’s first attempt to establish a framework and whole community approach for reunifying children separated from their parents or legal guardians in the aftermath of a disaster.

To ensure that this initiative was truly comprehensive, whole community partners from across the country were engaged in the development of the Post Disaster Reunification of Children:  A Nationwide Approach, to include regional, state and local counterparts, a multitude of voluntary & faith based organizations, children’s organizations, disability organizations, pediatric experts, and other applicable stakeholders and advocacy groups.  The overall objective of this initiative strives to:

  • Assist state, local and tribal governments in determining processes, communication lines, and the identification of roles and responsibilities necessary to facilitate the expeditious reunification of children separated as a result of disaster;
  • Encourage stakeholders and community leaders to develop and build upon existing and pre-disaster relationships;
  • Establish an understanding of how all parties (leading and supporting) can work together to support each other’s missions, and;
  • Identify tools and resources that could assist States and localities in disaster related reunification efforts.

The  Post Disaster Reunification of Children:  A Nationwide Approach and other reunification resources can be found on the Reunification Resources page on the National Mass Care Strategy website.

Additionally, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) recently launched the Unaccompanied Minors Registry (UMR), our country’s first national repository created to support the NCMEC’s ability to collect, store, report, and act on information related to children separated as a result of disaster.  The UMR is available during all disasters (not only Presidential) and can be accessed on the following link http://umr.missingkids.com.